Bailey makes impressive showing in Westmoreland County

Within 24 hours of officially being placed on the democrat ballot for attorney general, and with no organization or campaign financing in place, Don Bailey finished strong in an endorsement contest among Westmoreland County democrats on Saturday.  Kathleen Kane also made a strong showing, and it was obvious that she had targeted Westmoreland County, with a substantial staff on hand to distribute campaign literature, and having made several visits to Westmoreland over the numerous months since she announced her candidacy.  Bucks county lawyer Patrick Murphy finished last, despite the fact that he also has been campaigning for months, boasted of over a million dollars in donations (Kane boasts of 2 million in cash-on-hand), and was even on the staff of Westmoreland County state representative Thomas Tangretti. Bailey was the first of the attorney general candidates to speak, and wasted no time focusing right in on his major campaign theme – public corruption.  Bailey stirred the crowd with his mantra that “Tom Corbett cannot hide” from his political use of the office of attorney general, for both protection of his chronies and attacks on his adversaries, leading to travesties like the Penn State scandal, and Bailey promised to be a constant reminder … Continue Reading ››

PCRLN endorses Don Bailey for Attorney General

After a short delay in being officially placed on the ballot, Don Bailey has met all conditions for filing, and the Secretary of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania has accepted his nomination petition as candidate for the Office of Attorney General.   PCRLN is proud to be the first to offer its endorsement of Don’s candidacy.  He will be on the ballot as one of three democrat candidates vying for the position as Pennsylvania’s highest law enforcement officer in the April 24, 2012 primary. Our endorsement of Don comes from the fact that he alone appears to have the courage, and the institutional understanding, to attack the problems in Pennsylvania politically at their real source, as we have discussed them here.  The real problem is the courts and their utilization as instruments of political control and favoritism to establish and maintain cultural and political climates that lay beneath the general feeling of unfairness that more and more Pennsylvanians are coming to experience in the courts, and the insidious effects these things are having on our society, vis. the Penn State scandal, etc.. As we make this endorsement, Steve Conklin and his 84 year-old father are moving from room-to-room looking for relief from their mistreatment … Continue Reading ››

Miles Thomas – devoted husband and model citizen dies with dignity – despite the indignities of the federal courts

We sadly announce the passing of Miles Thomas at the Holy Spirit Hospital on Wednesday, February 15, 2102, at the age of 75.  John Luciew of the Patriot followed the first federal case, and the reunion, and published an article in the Patriot News announcing Miles’ death, and giving a kind tribute to Miles, and his efforts to be reunited with his dog named Baron.  John did a great job covering what was a very real and uncomplicated public interest story, and Miles remained specifically grateful to John until the end. Miles lived the most dignified of lives by all measures.  Miles had a successful career as a stockbroker and investment banker, and was a devoted husband.  He was a member of the Harrisburg School Board who was known for his commitment to the community, and served for years on the Dauphin County Republican committee.  Miles spent the last of his life’s saving’s, including his house and most of his personal possessions, in the care of his wife of many years, who had suffered with alzheimers until her death. After his wife’s passing, Miles had experienced brief periods of homelessness, living, at times, out of his car, with his collie … Continue Reading ››

“I thought my case just fell between the cracks” – Bailey client motions to open updates, etc.

“I thought justice didn’t work for me in my case.” “I figured that the judge just didn’t see it the same way.” “The system just failed me in my case.” These are some of the refrains heard from the numerous frustrated and disenfranchised clients and former clients of Don Bailey who have filed motions to open judgment, and others such clients who haven’t.  None have said “my attorney failed me”, “my attorney just didn’t care about my case”, “my attorney just wanted the money”, or other such things that are more commonly attributed to those who have received unfair and unjust results through the legal process. What has become clear, as has been pointed out in other articles, is that many individuals have come to Don Bailey feeling those things that only can be felt by those whose civil rights - inherent and inalienable rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness - have been violated in the course of their daily pursuits, and then are subjected to another, less easy to define, less easy to understand, deprivation of their rights by the courts, and the judges who are the stewards of our access to justice.  By engaging in the course of … Continue Reading ››

One American family’s experience with race, and how the federal courts became the lasting problem

Among the Bailey clients who have filed a motion to open judgment are Angela and Johnny Robinson, a mixed race couple, and their child, who live in Harrisburg.  Until they became involved in the Central Pennsylvania Youth Soccer League, the Robinson's considered themselves a normal American family – both Johnny and Angela come from families with war veterans, going back to World War 2, and were proud of their family, and the values they were trying to instill in their child. That all changed when their daughter was placed on a team coached by a racist City of Harrisburg employee, Eric Hicks.   Before at least one game, Hicks told his team “let’s go kick those white girls’ butts”, and at other times told the team to not shake the other teams' hands because their race, and to not tell their parents things that he had said or done.  The Robinson’s reported Hicks’ racist and otherwise inappropriate conduct to the City and to the league, and that is when the saga really began, ultimately ending with the Robinson’s suspension from the league – for daring to speak out about racist misconduct. The facts of the case are set forth in the Third Circuit … Continue Reading ››