PCRLN meets with Pennsylvania Judicial Conduct Board concerning unconstitutional treatment and dismissals of meritorious complaints of judicial misconduct

PCRLN meets with Pennsylvania Judicial Conduct Board Concerning Unconstitutional Treatment and Dismissals of Meritorious Complaints of Judicial Misconduct

Through the efforts of Diane Gochin of the Pennsylvania Civil Rights Law Network (PCRLN), the Pennsylvania Judicial Conduct Board (JCB)  agreed to meet with her and Andy Ostrowski on June 7, 2013,  concerning petitions sent  to the JCB on behalf of a dozen  Pennsylvania citizens from across the Commonwealth,  concerning inaction and dismissal of meritorious complaints of judicial misconduct.  Diane had requested a joint meeting with the other Pennsylvanians who petitioned the JCB for action, but the Board agreed to meet only with her at this time.

Diane’s complaints of judicial misconduct are against two Montgomery County Court of Common Pleas Judges (one was a  petitioner in the recently-rejected challenge to the constitutionality of the mandatory retirement provision of Pennsylvania Constitution Article 5), over her divorce proceeding, which has been allowed to linger  for over 6 years without even getting to the issue of equitable distribution, despite Diane’s repeated efforts and requests.  The gravamen of her complaints is that these judges are favoring members of the  county bar association, and … Continue Reading ››

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Bailey challenges Supreme Court with serious due process deprivations in response to recommended suspension of law license/PCRLN history of coverage

The initial coverage on this site centered on the disciplinary proceedings filed against civil rights lawyer Don Bailey in early 2011.  From the start, we have contended that the Bailey disciplinary proceedings would show the need for court reform through the difficulties that American citizens were having in bringing their claims for the violations of their individual constitutional rights in the courts.  This is what has been shown, and the need for reform remains clear. On May 1, 2013, the Supreme Court Disciplinary Board, as we predicted, recommended that Don Bailey be suspended from the practice of law for 5 years for doing nothing other than criticizing judges for not being fair, and, on June 7, 2013, Don Bailey filed a response demonstrating clearly both 1) that he was right in so-criticizing, and 2) that, as we have covered at length here, the proceedings against him, because they had a bogus origin and were designed to serve an illicit agenda, were bereft of the most basic due process protections. We asked, from the beginning on this site, that readers take the time to digest and understand the issues that we have been discussing, and the very important themes that they reveal in … Continue Reading ››