Category Archives: The Tom Corbett Corruption Files

From Yardbird.com – Paterno takes the fall

A large part of the legacy of the Penn State/Sandusky scandal has been lost this week with the passing of legendary coach and Penn State benefactor Joe Paterno.  The what he knows and when he knew its and what he should have dones are now forever academic.  We posited that Paterno was, to a degree, a victim of the Penn State/Good old boys network of attorneys, politicians, and judges who have been acculturated to control and conceal institutionally damaging information.  This has been discussed in the Margo Royer matter as well.  All that will be further said at this point is that Pennsylvania has lost a larger-than-life man whose legacy may have been unfairly tarnished by those to whom responsible charge of the information was entrusted. Bill Keisling of Yardbird Books has published a well-researched analysis of the Sandusky scandal in the larger context of the political use of the Office of Attorney General by Governor Tom Corbett, with detailed discussion of the primacy of the bonusgate scandal.  Keisling explores in detail how Corbett dedicated untold resources to the political prosecution of legislators in comparison to the deliberately impotent effort to investigate the Sandusky allegations, and the real costs involved in … Continue Reading ››
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Penn State/Sandusky prediction: pleas 3 – trials 0

This post represents only the views of its author, and is in the nature of a New Years’ prognostication for 2012, with certain implications on themes that have been discussed on this site.  It was not offered sooner because of the urgency of the Conklin matters, which have been reported about, and will continue to be followed. The prediction, as suggested in the title, is that Jerry Sandusky, and the two other fellows – Tim Curley, Athletic Director, and Gary Schultz, head of campus police - will make plea agreements to end their cases, and that there will never be another evidentiary hearing or trial related to these matters.   Sandusky can already be convicted on the testimony of McQueary, a couple victims, and Sandusky's odd public statements – the Costas one alone sealed that fate, and the New York Times one is further relevant for these and other purposes.  Although the charges have not been studied, it is likely that the charges against Curley and Schultz have room for appropriate reduction in the plea bargain process, and that neither of them would face jail time – Barry Bonds recently avoided jail time, and he went to trial. Sandusky will likely have … Continue Reading ››
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PA Governor Tom Corbett and members of his executive team covered up millions of dollars of fraud, corruption, and gross mismanagement in the Office of the Attorney General (OAG) of Pennsylvania.

From CorbettGate.com: Thomas Kimmett, Corbett's former Senior Deputy Attorney General, sued Corbett and members of his executive team for covering up millions of dollars of fraud, corruption, and gross mismanagement in the Office of the Attorney General (OAG) of Pennsylvania. Rather than ordering an investigation of the matter, Corbett and his team fired Thomas Kimmett, the lawsuit alleges. In thousands of pages of court documents, Kimmett - a Republican attorney and an accountant - alleged that Corbett’s office paid Private Collection Agencies (PCA’s) millions of dollars they were not owed and gave favored debtors sweetheart deals. In one example, a “favored” collection agency received a $300,000 commission to collect a debt that had been paid before the agency received the case, Kimmett alleges. In another case, the OAG reduced a nearly $1 million debt to only $20,000 without proper authorizations or backup documentation. More than 2,000 cases were never assigned to a collector, hundreds of accounts sat inactive with the collections agencies beyond their designated 6-month limits, and millions of dollars of accounts went without any collection activity for more than two years, Kimmett alleges in a July, 2010 filing of the Statement of Facts. Furthermore, collection agencies failed to … Continue Reading ››
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